Freedom

The town was once a part of Effingham called "North Effingham". Following an influx of new settlers from Maine, there was a conflict of culture and religion between them and people from the New Hampshire seacoast area who already populated Effingham. As a result, North Effingham separated into a town of its own. The community, incorporated in 1831, was named "Freedom" to commemorate its separation from Effingham.

Freedom is a small town surrounding a little village. Take a walk through the village on a Saturday evening and you’ll encounter few cars, but enjoy the white picket fences, well-kept homes and large barns that hint of the towns history.

For a tangible taste of Freedom history, visit The Historical Society’s charming museum where lemonade and cookies are served to visitors on summer afternoons. Members can also provide a quick sketch of the history of Freedom as seen in the houses standing along the quiet village streets.

Every year in August the community of Freedom celebrates “Old Home Week”, a New Hampshire tradition that was officially recognized by Proclamation in the New Hampshire State Legislature in 1913.

In the Village you’ll find the Town Hall, a Protestant church, Masonic Lodge and the Freedom Village Store: a non-profit, volunteer run store where you can get a cup of coffee, buy a newspaper and catch up with your neighbors.

Allard House & Works Museum, Freedom Historical Society


● The town was the setting for the children's fantasy book The Enormous Egg by Oliver Butterworth, first published in 1956 but reissued years later.

● "House on Loon Lake", a 2001 episode of This American Life, depicted an abandoned house explored by young boys in town for summer camp at Loon Lake.


For more information, please visit the town website at: https://townoffreedom.net


https://www.facebook.com/places/Things-to-do-in-Freedom-New-Hampshire/109472899071728/